Dear Diary,

Some people have all the breaks. Sam Goldwyn has been looking for six Washington secretaries to appear in the new Bob Hope picture, “They Got Me Covered.” One of the first girls chosen was Mary Byrne from Dallas. Can you imagine such lucy? She goes to Washington, gets a job a secretary (probably at about $150 a month), and winds up in Hollywood making a picture with none other than Bob Hope! Oh well, I’ll make up for lost time when I meet Bob. What do you mean, I’ll never meet him? I will too. Oh, you want to fight about it?

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Dear Diary,

I saw in the paper today that Hedda Hopper’s newest short subject is booked for early release. That’s the one which deals with the program Bob Hope gave for 5000 sailors at Long Beach, despite President Roosevelt’s taking his air time for an address. Hedda had the show filmed and put it in her short subject, Hedda Hopper’s Hollywood.

Kay Kyser gave Horace Heidt and Dallas a pretty good plug tonight. One of the questions was: “What ochestra leader, now at the Majestic Theater in Dallas, Texas, features tripple-tonguing trumpets?” The man answered Horace Heidt immediately. Speaking of Horace, I decided Saturday that, next to Bob Hope, he has about the purtiest shoulders in the world.

Dear Diary,

Jean and Betty Lou and I went to Wee St Andrews today and played miniature golf. Gee, more fun! I felt like Bob Hope, in a small way. Evidently Jean must have felt like Bing Crosby, because she won two games out of two. Poor Betty Lou came in on the tail end of both games, which, of course, left me second both times. We’re going again next week if we ossibly can. I’m determined to beat Jean.

After we finished playing, we went to Lake Cliff and walked around the entire lake. But you might know that when we found a nice shady spot with a good view of the lake, we sat down and looked for a while. We all felt as if we had walked around Texas by the time we got home.

Dear Diary,

One of Bing Crosby’s guests tonight was Jack Teagarden. He told Bing he opened at a new theater about the same time Bing Bob Hope were in Texas. He said he knew because he had flown over Dallas a couple of days before he opened in California and had seen the two of them playing down below. Bing asked, “But how did you know that was Sickle-snoot and me playing down there?” Jack said, “Because two of the foursome were on the fairway and the other two were on the Road to Zanzibar.” Jack continued, “You and Hope must have made a lot of money for the Red Cross there in Dallas. There were at least 8,000 people in that crowd.” Bing said, “Aw, how could you count all those people from way up there?” Jack:”Just like I count hep-cats on the dance floor. I count all the arms and legs I can see swinging around and divide by four.”

Dear Diary,

Bob Hope took his program to Camp Callen tonight. Boy, if he ever gets drafted, he should feel right at home. He’s visited practically every camp in California, and he goes to another one next week.

Billie Burke was his guest again tonight. Frankly I be perfectly content if he took Betty Hutton and Frances Langford off the show and gave their time to Billie. Billie and Silly, or Burke and Jerk go well together. Of course, she’s always insulting him or making fun of something about him, but then who isn’t?

I didn’t expect Bob to say anything about coming to Dallas tomorrow, but right at the end of the program, Ben Gage wished him luck in the golf tour he and Bing Crosby are playing in Dallas, Houston and San Antonio. (I wish he’d leave out those other cities and spend three days in Dallas.)

Dear Diary,

Sister and D.L. came in today from East Texas. It’s the first time I’ve seen them for several months.

Up until tonight I wasn’t sure what time Bob Hope would start socking that little white pill next Wednesday. I found out that it starts at two o’clock. You can bet your sweet life I’ll be out at Brook Hollow by twelve, at the latest.

The Metropolitan Opera Company paid tribute to Dallas as being one the country’s outstanding cities in music culture and appreciation. The tribute, which lasted about ten minutes, was one of the intermission features one the weekly Metropolitan radio programs. Dallas was one of only sixteen cities ever to receive such an honor from the Metropolitan Opera Company.

Dear Diary,

I got two pictures of Bob Hope today, and he had his arm around a girl in both of them. One of the girl’s was Betty Hutton and the other was Paulette Goddard. Boy, does that guy get around. Every day I find pictures of him with a different gal. I wonder if he ever gets tired of posing with beautiful women. (Am I kidding?)

Bob Hope and Bing Crosby finally made up their very changeable minds and decided to come to Dallas February 11 after all. If they could always come out with decisions like that, I wouldn’t care if they took six or seven months to make up their minds. I have my ticket already, because I saw in the paper yesterday that they were definitely coming. I wasted no time in getting my ticket yesterday afternoon.

Dear Diary,

I cut out and pasted so many pictures of Bob Hope today that I think I’ll have the reflection in my eyes for days to come. I counted them too, but I was listening to the radio at the same time, and I didn’t do a very accurate job. As far as I can figure, though, I have something over six hundred pictures.

The radio program I heard was the radio celebration of the President’s sixtieth anniversary. A few minutes of the show originated from Dallas, but all that was done here was a short (overly eloquent) speech and one orchestral number. Other parts of the program came from New York, Washington, Hollywood, Detroit, and Oklahoma City. All those cities, along with Dallas, contributed the entire show. Got once, Bob Hope was not on a benefit show. Imagine!

Dear Diary,

Dallas had its first blackout tonight. It was really an event to remember, because it was a complete success in Dallas, Ft. Worth, and surrounding territories. All Dallas and Ft. Worth radio stations carried a description of the blackout and on every hand it was reported that within a minute and a half past nine, the official starting time, every light in the two counties—Dallas and Tarrant—was extinguished. There were many planes overhead so high that they could be neither seen nor heard, and once several of them dropped flares just to show the people that they were really there.

This was one occasion where I’d welcome Bob Hope even more than ever. I would like to hear him describe the total darkness all Dallasites witnessed tonight. I’ll bet that would be worth listening to!

Dear Diary,

I went to the Cotton Bowl game today. Alabama defeated Texas A. & M. 29 to 21. It was so cold at the game that my feet almost broke off. As a matter of fact, this has been one of the coldest days in Dallas in almost two years.

Mary Martin joined the gang on the Kraft Music Hall tonight. She took Connie Boswell’s place, since Connie is going ona long personal appearance tour throughout the East. Victor Borge gave a repeat performance of his phoenetic (Is that the way to spell it?) punctuation. Not only that, but he also became a regular member of the gang tonight. With all those good stars on the program (including Jerry Lester and Bing), it is second to only one program—Bob Hope.

Dear Diary,

A Bob Hope picture is showing at the Varsity today, but I know Mother wouldn’t even consider letting me go see it so I don’t guess I’ll go. The picture is “Never Say Die.” I’ve never seen it, and I’d sorta like to know what kind of pictures he made before I “discovered” him. (I wonder if he’d like that about my discovering him. I seriously doubt it.)

Dear Diary,

I went to Fort Worth today to the Amon Carter Riverside-Sunset football game at Farrington Field in Forth Worth. Sunset won the game 14-0. We play Highland Park in Dallas next Saturday.

I didn’t get much to to fiddle around with my pictures of Bob Hope, on account of the ball game.

Dear Diary,

Bob Hope was showing at the Bison today in “Caught In the Draft,” but naturally I didn’t go see it because I’ve already seen it more than any of his other pictures, and I really didn’t enjoy it as mch as the others. Anyway, I’m still waiting patiently for “Nothing But the Truth” to come to Oak Cliff and for “Louisiana Purchase” to come to Dallas, so why should I waste my money on old pictures like “C.I.T.D.,” huh? No, I don’t know either.

Dear Diary,

We got home tonight at 9:30. We drove from Albuquerque to Dallas today. It sure is good to see everything and everybody again. The Whites saw us turn the corner and couldn’t wait until tomorrow, so they came up for a few minutes.

Jerry Lester was better than usual tonight. I just started wondering how Bob Hope and Jerry Lester would be together. Jerry would probably be so dull beside Bob that I’d hate him, and I wouldn’t want that to happen.

Dear Diary,

I dreamed about Bob Hope all night last night. I dreamed that his picture was on the front page of every newspaper in Dallas. He had on a white coat and was playing—of all things—a trumpet. I think I know where I got that trumpet idea. Some time ago I was looking through a magazine several years old and I found a picture of Bob playing a trumpet.

Dear Diary,

I got a new picture of Bob Hope today. It’s from “Nothing But the Truth” and it shows Bob in a tank of anchovies with a crab draped aross his forehead.

I imagine “Nothing But the Truth” will be released in a few months, because it will be shown to southern distributers here in Dallas next week.

Dear Diary,

The following article was in the paper today: Bob Hope is funny even by remote control. When Jack Pepper opened the new Log Cabin in Dallas Bob Hope sent him a telegram:

“Passed by Log Cabin last night. Saw your name in front. Passed by.”

Bob Hope

I saw “The Road to Zanzibar” twice today. That makes eight times. I imagine that’s the last time I’ll see it for a month or two, until it goes to the Texas.

Dear Diary,

I went to the Majestic today with the Whites and Mother. In the newsreel they showed several academy award presentations but they didn’t show the best actor and actress and they didn’t even show Bob Hope. Maybe I’m wrong but that seems silly to me, just showing two or three minor awards.

Bob Hawk broadcast “Take It or Leave It” from Dallas tonight. He payed a nice compliment to the Texas weather and even Californians have to admit that right now it’s better than theirs. (It always is.)

Dear Diary,

Today Hedda Hopper shattered my dreams. Bob Hope and Bing Crosby were going to go on a golf tour over the country and would have come to Dallas. That’s where Hedda Hopper comes in. Today she said, “The golf tour planned by Bob Hope and Bing Crosby, which would have taken them to Dallas and Ft. Worth and to a match with the Duke of Windsor in Florida, was called off five minutes ago because Bing has to report for work on a new picture.” I have one consolation though. I found out in the morning paper that Paramount had succeeded in buying the screen rights to “Louisiana Purchase” and that Bob Hope had been assigned the leading role.

Dear Diary,

I stayed in the house almost all day today. I didn’t feel very good this morning, so instead of going to Sunday School I stayed home and ate a half a dozen oranges. At 5:30 I listened to the Quiz of the Cities. Last week Fort Worth won by twenty pointes, but today Dallas won by forty-one points, which only goes to show you—I listened to the Gulf Screen Guild Theatre tonight. It was a cute comedy but I don’t see what part Bob Hope could have taken because the haracters were a rich man, a poor girl, and a gangster.