Dear Diary,

Today was the twentieth anniversary of WFAA, so there was a big article about it in the morning paper. It went back through the years with radio, naming the big names and songs through the years. It stated that “1942 has been a year of Bob Hope and Deep in the Heart of Texas.” There was a big radio program tonight celebrating the anniversary. Little Orvie Anderson wrote the script and did a dramatic sketch about Corregidor. I missed it on account of my dancing lesson, (darn it!) but Betty Lou and I went up to the studios just as the crowd was leaving, and everyone was saying it was the best show WFAA had ever done, and that Orvie really “strutted his stuff” and did some fine acting in the sketch.

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Dear Diary,

Bob Hope broke some kind of a record tonight for good programs. He was absolutely tops. He was broadcasting from an air corps center at Ontario, California, and Brenda Marshall was his guest. He got an idea to woo Brenda two ways—as Charles Boyer and Jimmie Cagney. He said, “Say, Brenda, I’ve got an idea! You have? Yeh.” I almost fell out of bed laughing. It wasn’t awfully funny, but the way he said it! Wow! As Charles Boyer he walked up and rang Brenda’s doorbell, and it started playing “Deep in the Heart of Texas.” Bob said, “Now isn’t that patriotic? Everywhere you go—the national anthem!” After the mixture of cheering and booing had died down, Bob said, “Well, at least there are some Texans in the crowd!”

Dear Diary,

Bob Hope’s show was so good tonight (March 31) I believe I’ll continue the discussion here. Bob was talking about the premiere of “My Favorite Blonde” which was held last night. He said, “When I came on the screen, a man in back of me started applauding, so I turned around and said, ‘Thanks for the applause. I’m Bob Hope.’ He replied, ‘I’m not applauding. I have a portable and I’m listening to “Deep in the Heart of Texas.”‘” Still speaking of the premier, Bob said, “Kissing Madeleine Carroll and making love scenes with her is just another day’s work to me.” Andy Devine said, “Gosh, Bob, what do you want out of life?” Bob replied, “Just another day’s work!” What a man! But then, can you blame him? I can’t.

Dear Diary,

Bob Hope was better tonight than he has been in weeks. He was broadcasting from an army camp, but he was not allowed to say which one. He said, “The get us to this unidentified camp in an unidentified location, an unidentified driver drove us here by an unidentified route, in an unidentified jeep, and now I’m sore in an unidentified place.” He added, “Everyone in the jeep was blindfolded except the driver, and driving on Sunset Blvd. shattered his nerves so badly that he put on a blindfold too.” Andy Devine was Bob’s guest instead of Joel McCrea. Bob was visiting Andy’s ranch on the sketch tonight and he sang a few bars of “Deep in the Heart of Texas” with squirts of milk in place of claps. That’s the first time that song has ever been sung on Bob’s program, as much as he talks about it.

Dear Diary,

Bob Hope wasn’t up to his usual high standards tonight. I can’t imagine what was wrong, but he just didn’t seem to have as much zing as usual. His guest tonight was Patsy Kelly. He was broadcasting from Camp San Louis Obispo. He said, “On the way up I decided to save my tires by taking them off for a while and using victrola records. We hit one pedestrian, and that’s the first time anyone was ever hit deep in the heart of Texas by Rose O’Day and had Jim bring him pretty flowers.” Naturally Bob was kidded a lot (as usual) about his tummy. He said, “If you are referring to that bulge under my belt, that’s not a pot tummy. My bubble gum backfired.” Joel McCrea will be Bob’s guest next week.

Dear Diary,

Bob Hope really did “dispose of” Betty Hutton, but, as I feared, Skinnay Ennis sang in her place. Right after Bob’s first five-minute solo he introduced the announcer, but Skinnay rushed in to say that he wasn’t there yet. He told Bob to be funny and tell a few gags until Larry arrived. Bob said, “Gosh, let me think. Oh, yes, a funny thing happened to me on the way to the San Diego Marine Base today, and I wish I could remember what it was. O-o-o, my writers told me there’d be times like this.” Bob and Skinnay gave the commercial by themselves (almost), but you might know Larry would phone in and help them (darn it). Bob pulled a couple of gags about Texas. One of them was, “Skinnay Ennis is the only singer who sings ‘Deep in the Heart of Texas’ from deep in the heart of an oxygen tent.” The other was much cuter, but I’ll be darned if I can remember it.

Dear Diary,

Gee, is Texas getting a lot of publicity lately. Deep in the Heart of Texas is second on the Hit Parade now. I’ve been keeping account and I’ve heard it on the radio ten times this week by just listening to the programs I always hear. I’ll bet if Bob Hope sang it on his program it would be first pretty soon (maybe.) Oh yes, speaking of Bob Hope, I’m just wondering what’s going to happen on that poor Gulf Screen Guild Theater tomorrow when Bob, Bing Crosby, and Hedy Lamarr take over in the play, “Too Many Husbands.” That’s going to be hot stuff. I’m just trying to figure out which one of the two will turn out to be “excess” baggage.

Dear Diary,

Bob Hope has acquired a habit I’ve been wishing he get for months. He talks quite a bit about Texas. It may be a passing fancy, but if so, it’s been four weeks in passing. Bob was at Camp Cook tonight, and he was talking about how hard it was to shave in a crowded room (they told him as they sewed his nose back on). He said, “I saw one tough fellow  here from Texas. He didn’t bother with razors. He just pulled out a pivot tooth and scraped.” Bob told about taking a tank ride while he was there, too. He said, “The tank was shaking and bouncing so much that they finally told me to do something to take it off my mind. I tried singing ‘Deep in the Heart of Texas,’ but it didn’t do any good, because I soon got a callouse somewhere near Dallas.”

Babe Ruth finally made it. He was Bob’s guest tonight.

Dear Diary,

I bought my bicycle license today. When I left home it was rather warm so I wore a light jacket over my twin sweaters and was completely comfortable. Before I got home it had turned so cold that I couldn’t feel my ears, and my hands and feet were so cold I could hardly move them to get off of my bicycle. That, friends, is a sample of Texas weather. (Speaking of Texas, “Deep In the Heart of Texas” jumped from ninth last week to third on the Hit Parade this week.)

Well this is the last day of February. Boy, what a month it has been. As far as Bob Hope is concerned it’s been about the most eventful month of my life. It has been different in another way too. I’ve had the worst head cold I can remember. Counting today, I’ve had it twenty-four days, and it’s still going strong.

Dear Diary,

Bob Hope took the gang to Camp Roberts for the broadcast tonight. I don’t know what caused it, but he was as good tonight as is humanly possible. He was really operating. He said, “You know those beautiful Greyhound busses that run up here? Well, I came up on a shuffling Pekingese.” He mentioned that the barracks at Camp Roberts was a thousand cots separated by individual crap games. He said, “I got in a crap game with a few of the boys, and I’m not saying I was winning, but a tourist poked his head in the door and said, ‘Is this Camp Roberts?’ One of the soldiers replied, ‘No, but one more shot and it will be’.” Patsy Kelly asked Bob what became of Yehudi and Bob replied, “Oh he’s got a new job now. You know that new song ‘Deep in the Heart of Texas’? Well, Yehudi is the little man who claps four times.” Bob was singing the theme when the show was cut off.